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You're Not Imagining It; Shrinkflation Is Real

SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA - JULY 06: Boxes of cereal are displayed on a shelf at a Target store on July 06, 2022 in San Rafael, California. Manufacturers are using “shrinkflation” techniques as costs to produce goods increase. Some are making the packaging smaller but charging the same prices as they were prior to the reduction in size. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

You're Not Imagining It; Shrinkflation Is Real

SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA - JULY 06: Boxes of cereal are displayed on a shelf at a Target store on July 06, 2022 in San Rafael, California. Manufacturers are using “shrinkflation” techniques as costs to produce goods increase. Some are making the packaging smaller but charging the same prices as they were prior to the reduction in size. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

You're Not Imagining It; Shrinkflation Is Real

Here's one sign that shrinkflation is no longer just a topic for economics nerds. Cookie Monster recently complained on social media that his favorite food was getting smaller. "Me hate shrinkflation!" the fuzzy blue monster declared. "Guess me going to have to eat double da cookies!" President Biden promised to sign a bill banning it during his State of the Union address. Shrinkflation isn't new. It's been happening for years. But people seem to be paying more attention right now amidst high food prices and inflation. And the White House is clearly aware of that. After years of rising prices, many Americans are fed up with paying more and getting less. Will the pendulum ever swing back? For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA - JULY 06: Boxes of cereal are displayed on a shelf at a Target store on July 06, 2022 in San Rafael, California. Manufacturers are using “shrinkflation” techniques as costs to produce goods increase. Some are making the packaging smaller but charging the same prices as they were prior to the reduction in size. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

 

Here's one sign that shrinkflation is no longer just a topic for economics nerds.

Cookie Monster recently complained on social media that his favorite food was getting smaller. "Me hate shrinkflation!" the fuzzy blue monster declared. "Guess me going to have to eat double da cookies!"

President Biden promised to sign a bill banning it during his State of the Union address.

Shrinkflation isn't new.

It's been happening for years. But people seem to be paying more attention right now amidst high food prices and inflation. And the White House is clearly aware of that.

After years of rising prices, many Americans are fed up with paying more and getting less. Will the pendulum ever swing back?

For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices

NPR Privacy Policy

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