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What Do We Understand About Long COVID?

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 18: People with symptoms of long Covid sit in the audience as they listen during a Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions hearing titled “Addressing Long COVID: Advancing Research and Improving Patient Care” on Capitol Hill January 18, 2024 in Washington, DC. The hearing focused on long Covid research and patient care. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

What Do We Understand About Long COVID?

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 18: People with symptoms of long Covid sit in the audience as they listen during a Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions hearing titled “Addressing Long COVID: Advancing Research and Improving Patient Care” on Capitol Hill January 18, 2024 in Washington, DC. The hearing focused on long Covid research and patient care. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

What Do We Understand About Long COVID?

This week marks four years since the outbreak of Covid-19 was officially declared a pandemic. One of the most vexing legacies — one that science still hasn't solved — is long Covid. That's the debilitating condition that can develop in the aftermath of an infection. Millions of Americans are living with the often debilitating symptoms that can include brain fog, shortness of breath, and low energy. Some struggle with simple daily living tasks like laundry and cooking. Four years since the pandemic hit, patients with long Covid are still fighting for answers. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 18: People with symptoms of long Covid sit in the audience as they listen during a Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions hearing titled “Addressing Long COVID: Advancing Research and Improving Patient Care” on Capitol Hill January 18, 2024 in Washington, DC. The hearing focused on long Covid research and patient care. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

 

This week marks four years since the outbreak of Covid-19 was officially declared a pandemic. One of the most vexing legacies — one that science still hasn't solved — is long Covid. That's the debilitating condition that can develop in the aftermath of an infection.

Millions of Americans are living with the often debilitating symptoms that can include brain fog, shortness of breath, and low energy. Some struggle with simple daily living tasks like laundry and cooking.

Four years since the pandemic hit, patients with long Covid are still fighting for answers.

For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices

NPR Privacy Policy

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