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The push to deliver high-speed rail to Texas

High speed trains are lined up after undergoing maintenance in preparation for the annual Lunar New Year travel peak, at a maintenance base in Wuhan, in China’s central Hubei province early on January 26, 2024. (Photo by AFP) / China OUT (Photo by STR/AFP via Getty Images)

STR/AFP via Getty Images

The push to deliver high-speed rail to Texas

High speed trains are lined up after undergoing maintenance in preparation for the annual Lunar New Year travel peak, at a maintenance base in Wuhan, in China’s central Hubei province early on January 26, 2024. (Photo by AFP) / China OUT (Photo by STR/AFP via Getty Images)

STR/AFP via Getty Images

The push to deliver high-speed rail to Texas

For the last 60 years a transportation revolution has largely passed America by. Bullet trains were invented in Japan in the early 1960s. Since then, countries all over the world have adopted the technology and constructed sprawling networks of high speed rail lines. Despite spending billions of dollars in federal funding, he U.S. lags far behind. But a recent visit from Japan's Prime minister has revived interest in bullet train projects around the country. One of those projects is in Texas – a proposed high-speed rail line between Houston and Dallas. NPR's Andrew Limbong speaks with Dallas Morning News mobility and transportation reporter Amber Gaudet about what it will take to get Texas' high-speed rail project completed, and what it could mean for high-speed rail in America. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

High speed trains are lined up after undergoing maintenance in preparation for the annual Lunar New Year travel peak, at a maintenance base in Wuhan, in China’s central Hubei province early on January 26, 2024. (Photo by AFP) / China OUT (Photo by STR/AFP via Getty Images)

STR/AFP via Getty Images

 

For the last 60 years a transportation revolution has largely passed America by.

Bullet trains were invented in Japan in the early 1960s. Since then, countries all over the world have adopted the technology and constructed sprawling networks of high speed rail lines.

Despite spending billions of dollars in federal funding, he U.S. lags far behind. But a recent visit from Japan's Prime minister has revived interest in bullet train projects around the country.

One of those projects is in Texas – a proposed high-speed rail line between Houston and Dallas.

NPR's Andrew Limbong speaks with Dallas Morning News mobility and transportation reporter Amber Gaudet about what it will take to get Texas' high-speed rail project completed, and what it could mean for high-speed rail in America.

Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices

NPR Privacy Policy

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