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Breaking down the legal case at the center of the political universe

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - APRIL 22: Former U.S. President Donald Trump sits in court for his trial for allegedly covering up hush money payments at Manhattan Criminal Court on April 22, 2024 in New York City. Trump was charged with 34 counts of falsifying business records last year, which prosecutors say was an effort to hide a potential sex scandal, both before and after the 2016 presidential election. Donald Trump’s unprecedented criminal trial is set for opening statements after final jury selection ended Friday. (Photo by Victor J. Blue - Pool/Getty Images)

Pool/Getty Images

Breaking down the legal case at the center of the political universe

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - APRIL 22: Former U.S. President Donald Trump sits in court for his trial for allegedly covering up hush money payments at Manhattan Criminal Court on April 22, 2024 in New York City. Trump was charged with 34 counts of falsifying business records last year, which prosecutors say was an effort to hide a potential sex scandal, both before and after the 2016 presidential election. Donald Trump’s unprecedented criminal trial is set for opening statements after final jury selection ended Friday. (Photo by Victor J. Blue - Pool/Getty Images)

Pool/Getty Images

Breaking down the legal case at the center of the political universe

The broad outlines of Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg's case have been known for months. Hush money payments to a former porn star made in 2016, when Trump was a presidential candidate. Bragg alleges Trump was involved in a scheme to cover up those payments, one that amounted to criminal fraud. Now we're getting a more detailed outline of their arguments – and Trump's defense. We break down the legal case at the center of the political universe. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - APRIL 22: Former U.S. President Donald Trump sits in court for his trial for allegedly covering up hush money payments at Manhattan Criminal Court on April 22, 2024 in New York City. Trump was charged with 34 counts of falsifying business records last year, which prosecutors say was an effort to hide a potential sex scandal, both before and after the 2016 presidential election. Donald Trump’s unprecedented criminal trial is set for opening statements after final jury selection ended Friday. (Photo by Victor J. Blue - Pool/Getty Images)

Pool/Getty Images

 

The broad outlines of Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg's case have been known for months.

Hush money payments to a former porn star made in 2016, when Trump was a presidential candidate. Bragg alleges Trump was involved in a scheme to cover up those payments, one that amounted to criminal fraud.

Now we're getting a more detailed outline of their arguments – and Trump's defense.

We break down the legal case at the center of the political universe.

For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices

NPR Privacy Policy

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