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With the end of apartheid South Africa became an emblem of democracy.  Is it still?
With the end of apartheid South Africa became an emblem of democracy.  Is it still?

With the end of apartheid South Africa became an emblem of democracy. Is it still?

Three decades ago, South Africa held its first democratic election, closing the door on the apartheid era. And Nelson Mandela was elected its first Black president. Today, the country is still led by Mandela's political party - the African National Congress. But polls show that voters are growing increasingly dissatisfied with the party's leadership, and next month's national elections could lead to the ANC having to share power with opposition parties. Thirty years ago, South Africa became an emblem of a multiracial democracy. Decades on, how is that legacy holding up? For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

 

Three decades ago, South Africa held its first democratic election, closing the door on the apartheid era.

And Nelson Mandela was elected its first Black president.

Today, the country is still led by Mandela's political party - the African National Congress. But polls show that voters are growing increasingly dissatisfied with the party's leadership, and next month's national elections could lead to the ANC having to share power with opposition parties.

Thirty years ago, South Africa became an emblem of a multiracial democracy. Decades on, how is that legacy holding up?

For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices

NPR Privacy Policy

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