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Daily Rehearsal: 'Rent' on

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- Nina Metz throws down about the new Riverfront Theater. It sounds like an all-together pleasant experience, but be warned: “The intersection of Chicago Avenue and Halsted Street is not, if we’re being frank, one of the city’s more picturesque stretches.”

- The Goodman will be doing staged readings for its residency program Playwrights Unit June 15-17; expect The Solid Sand Below by Martín Zimmerman, Work of Art by Elaine Romero, Stutter by Philip Dawkins and For Her as a Piano by Nambi E. Kelley. The readings are free, but require reservations, which can be obtained by going to their website of course.

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- Chicago Theatre Off Book is having a bowling party, where you can win tickets to Crowns at the Goodman. It’s July 1 at Timber Lanes, but $100 a lane so make sure you have some friends so you can beat the pants off of theater companies like Oracle, Mortar and the Goodman themselves.

- ATC has extended Rent through July 1. For a glimpse at two very different -- and hilarious -- opinions about this particular production from the common man, head over to the event listing at the Chicago Reader.

Questions? Tips? Email kdries@wbez.org.

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