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zombie fungus

Scientist Ester Gaya examines the fungus Isaria sinclairii on an insect also known as a zombie fungus at Kew Gardens’ fungarium in London, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. The release Wednesday of the scientists at the renowned Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew “State of the World’s Fungi” report, is touted as the first ever global look at the way fungi help provide food, medicine, plant nutrition, lifesaving drugs _ and can also spread death and destruction at an alarming pace. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)

Frank Augstein/AP

zombie fungus

Scientist Ester Gaya examines the fungus Isaria sinclairii on an insect also known as a zombie fungus at Kew Gardens’ fungarium in London, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. The release Wednesday of the scientists at the renowned Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew “State of the World’s Fungi” report, is touted as the first ever global look at the way fungi help provide food, medicine, plant nutrition, lifesaving drugs _ and can also spread death and destruction at an alarming pace. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)

Frank Augstein/AP

Don’t freak out, but the ‘zombie’ fungus from ‘The Last Of Us’ is real

A fungi species known as Ophiocordyceps unilateralis has the ability to control its host.

Scientist Ester Gaya examines the fungus Isaria sinclairii on an insect also known as a zombie fungus at Kew Gardens’ fungarium in London, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. The release Wednesday of the scientists at the renowned Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew “State of the World’s Fungi” report, is touted as the first ever global look at the way fungi help provide food, medicine, plant nutrition, lifesaving drugs _ and can also spread death and destruction at an alarming pace. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)

Frank Augstein/AP

   

A species of fungi has been in the spotlight thanks to the hit HBO series The Last of Us. In the series, peoples’ minds are hijacked by a lethal fungus that turns them into bloodthirsty zombies. But don’t worry, in reality humans are immune from the effects of this sort of fungus.

Reset learns all about how the fungus works with a scientist.

GUEST: Matthew Nelsen, Field Museum mycologist and evolutionary biologist

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