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Author Series: Richard Brookhiser

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Author Series: Richard Brookhiser

CPL/file

Richard Brookhiser, acclaimed popular historian and author of several bestsellers including Rules of Civility, will discuss and sign his new book, What Would the Founders Do?: Our Questions, Their Answers. What would Hamilton think about free trade? What would Franklin make of the national obsession with values? What would Washington say about gays in the military? Examining a host of issues from terrorism to women’s rights to gun control, Brookhiser reveals why we still turn to the Founders in moments of struggle, farce or disaster. Written with Brookhiser’s trademark eloquence and wit and deep knowledge of the Founders and American history, the book sheds new light on the disagreements and debates that have shaped our country.

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Recorded Tuesday, June 27, 2006 at Chicago Public Library.

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