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Beyond Showerheads and Sprinklers: The Great Lakes - Protecting and Managing

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Beyond Showerheads and Sprinklers: The Great Lakes - Protecting and Managing

MPC/file

Despite progress made by the regional pilot groups, Illinois still has more questions than answers when it comes to its water future. To help guide the development of a state plan for effective regional water management, water experts and professionals from Illinois and across the Great Lakes came together at “Beyond Showerheads and Sprinklers: Water Governance Solutions for Illinois,” an all-day conference held here in Chicago.

Sponsored by Openlands, Metropolitan Planning Council, and the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute, the conference was designed for state and local officials, agricultural and industrial water users, planners, utility representatives, conservation specialists, wastewater and stormwater management professionals, and other stakeholders.

Presenting the luncheon address was Samuel W. Speck, Commissioner of the International Joint Commission. He served as chair of the Great Lakes Commission, as well as chair of the Water Management Working Group of the Council of Great Lakes Governors, and Speck played a pivotal role in the development of the Great Lakes Compact.

Also recorded as part of this conference:
Freshwater Challenges - Global Problems, Local Solutions
Where We Are Now - Moving Forward with the Illinois Water Supply Planning Initiative
Focusing on Key Issues
The Great Lakes - Protecting and Managing
Is the State of Illinois Prepared for Water Shortages?

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Recorded Friday, May 16, 2008 at Union League Club of Chicago.

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