Climate Change To Quadruple Exposure Of 32 Million U.S. Outdoor Workers To Deadly Heat

Outdoor Workers
Members of a road construction crew take a break from working during a heat wave in Chicago in June, 2012, as temperatures approached 96°F. Between now and midcentury, continued global warming will increasingly expose outdoor workers to dangerous conditions, necessitate schedule adjustments or reductions in work hours, and is projected to put workers’ earnings at risk. Union of Concerned Scientists
Outdoor Workers
Members of a road construction crew take a break from working during a heat wave in Chicago in June, 2012, as temperatures approached 96°F. Between now and midcentury, continued global warming will increasingly expose outdoor workers to dangerous conditions, necessitate schedule adjustments or reductions in work hours, and is projected to put workers’ earnings at risk. Union of Concerned Scientists

Climate Change To Quadruple Exposure Of 32 Million U.S. Outdoor Workers To Deadly Heat

A new report examines how climate change is projected to quadruple the exposure of the roughly 32 million U.S. outdoor workers to hazardous heat conditions, while jeopardizing their health and earnings.

Rachel Licker of the Union of Concerned Scientists joins Reset to discuss her new co-authored report, “Too Hot to Work: Assessing the Threats Climate Change Poses to Outdoor Workers.”

GUEST: Rachel Licker, senior climate scientist at Union of Concerned Scientists