Growing Up In Post-Revolutionary Iran

In this Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019, photo, a girl walks past a poster of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, at a mosque where he made speeches, in northern Tehran, Iran. The memory of Khomeini, who died in 1989 at the age of 86, looms large over Tehran today. His image is on bank notes and in textbooks in Iran, often as an embodiment of the 1979 Islamic Revolution that swept aside the country’s shah and forever changed the nation.
In this Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019, photo, a girl walks past a poster of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, at a mosque where he made speeches, in northern Tehran, Iran. The memory of Khomeini, who died in 1989 at the age of 86, looms large over Tehran today. His image is on bank notes and in textbooks in Iran, often as an embodiment of the 1979 Islamic Revolution that swept aside the country’s shah and forever changed the nation. Vahid Salemi / AP Photo
In this Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019, photo, a girl walks past a poster of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, at a mosque where he made speeches, in northern Tehran, Iran. The memory of Khomeini, who died in 1989 at the age of 86, looms large over Tehran today. His image is on bank notes and in textbooks in Iran, often as an embodiment of the 1979 Islamic Revolution that swept aside the country’s shah and forever changed the nation.
In this Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019, photo, a girl walks past a poster of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, at a mosque where he made speeches, in northern Tehran, Iran. The memory of Khomeini, who died in 1989 at the age of 86, looms large over Tehran today. His image is on bank notes and in textbooks in Iran, often as an embodiment of the 1979 Islamic Revolution that swept aside the country’s shah and forever changed the nation. Vahid Salemi / AP Photo

Growing Up In Post-Revolutionary Iran

2019 marks 25 years that Worldview has brought you human stories from at home and abroad. Before Worldview goes off the air for the last time this fall, we wanted to bring you some selections from our deep archive. Nazila Fathi was just nine years old when the Iranian monarch, the shah, was ousted from power and the conservative Islamist government of Ayatollah Khomeini took over. The Iranian Revolution was an event that shaped her country and her own life. She came of age in a time of tremendous political and social upheaval. She went on to become The New York Times’ Iran correspondent until she was forced to flee in 2009, when she was covering the Green movement. She has chronicled her country’s history since the revolution and her own experience in her memoir “The Lonely War One Woman’s Account of the Struggle for Modern Iran.” Fathi told former Worldview producer Alexandra Salomon about growing up in post-revolutionary Iran during an interview in 2014.