Human Rights Lawyer On Legal Issues For Women And Girls In Iraq

A Yezidi woman collects water for her sheep from a truck on Mount Sinjar, 250 miles (404 kilometers) northwest of Baghdad, Iraq, Monday, Sept. 19, 2005. One of Iraq's forgotten religious minorities, the Yezidis eke out lives in the shadow Mount Singer.
A Yezidi woman collects water for her sheep from a truck on Mount Sinjar, 250 miles (404 kilometers) northwest of Baghdad, Iraq, Monday, Sept. 19, 2005. One of Iraq's forgotten religious minorities, the Yezidis eke out lives in the shadow Mount Singer. AP Photo/Jacob Silberberg
A Yezidi woman collects water for her sheep from a truck on Mount Sinjar, 250 miles (404 kilometers) northwest of Baghdad, Iraq, Monday, Sept. 19, 2005. One of Iraq's forgotten religious minorities, the Yezidis eke out lives in the shadow Mount Singer.
A Yezidi woman collects water for her sheep from a truck on Mount Sinjar, 250 miles (404 kilometers) northwest of Baghdad, Iraq, Monday, Sept. 19, 2005. One of Iraq's forgotten religious minorities, the Yezidis eke out lives in the shadow Mount Singer. AP Photo/Jacob Silberberg

Human Rights Lawyer On Legal Issues For Women And Girls In Iraq

In August 2014, ISIS attacked the northern Iraqi city of Erbil. Thousands fled to Mt. Sinjar, including the ethnic minority Yezidis. Many believe in coming to their aid, U.S. airstrikes and the Iraqi army prevented genocide. 

Iraqi troops and militia recently freed most of the city, but the loss of life and damage to property and civil society in Mosul were catastrophic. Traditional tribal and community structures have been torn apart in areas controlled by ISIS.

We speak with human rights lawyer Sherizaan Minwall about how the war has affected justice systems in Iraq. Minwalla says she is deeply concerned about justice for minority communities, like the Yazidis and Christians who she says have suffered horrific atrocities.

This segment was produced by Jerome McDonnell.