Mentors May Be The Key to Ending Chicago’s Violence

Jim Courtney-Clarks, 15, talks with Army veteran Alberto Bóleros during the Urban Warriors program in December 2015. The Chicago program is designed to bring together veterans and youth who have been exposed to the city’s violence.
Jim Courtney-Clarks, 15, talks with Army veteran Alberto Bóleros during the Urban Warriors program in December 2015. The Chicago program is designed to bring together veterans and youth who have been exposed to the city's violence. Alyssa Schukar/NPR, file
Jim Courtney-Clarks, 15, talks with Army veteran Alberto Bóleros during the Urban Warriors program in December 2015. The Chicago program is designed to bring together veterans and youth who have been exposed to the city’s violence.
Jim Courtney-Clarks, 15, talks with Army veteran Alberto Bóleros during the Urban Warriors program in December 2015. The Chicago program is designed to bring together veterans and youth who have been exposed to the city's violence. Alyssa Schukar/NPR, file

Mentors May Be The Key to Ending Chicago’s Violence

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is investing $36 million into mentorship over the next three years. Brad Whitlock, a former “Big Brother” and manager at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Chicago, joins Morning Shift to talk about why people should mentor, and what he’s learned doesn’t work.

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