New study found 1 in 5 families delayed medical care during pandemic

Hospitals around the U.S., including large academic medical centers like Vanderbilt University’s in Nashville, Tenn., have been forced to rely on traveling nurses to keep their intensive care units fully staffed. The demand for travel nurses has driven up their hourly rates, which then motivates more staff nurses to leave in pursuit of a traveling gig.
Hospitals around the U.S., including large academic medical centers like Vanderbilt University's in Nashville, Tenn., have been forced to rely on traveling nurses to keep their intensive care units fully staffed. The demand for travel nurses has driven up their hourly rates, which then motivates more staff nurses to leave in pursuit of a traveling gig. Blake Farmer/WPLN
Hospitals around the U.S., including large academic medical centers like Vanderbilt University’s in Nashville, Tenn., have been forced to rely on traveling nurses to keep their intensive care units fully staffed. The demand for travel nurses has driven up their hourly rates, which then motivates more staff nurses to leave in pursuit of a traveling gig.
Hospitals around the U.S., including large academic medical centers like Vanderbilt University's in Nashville, Tenn., have been forced to rely on traveling nurses to keep their intensive care units fully staffed. The demand for travel nurses has driven up their hourly rates, which then motivates more staff nurses to leave in pursuit of a traveling gig. Blake Farmer/WPLN

New study found 1 in 5 families delayed medical care during pandemic

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People with chronic health conditions can deteriorate quickly, and with delays in regular care, elective surgeries and cancer screenings, some patients are ending up in situations that are no longer treatable. Reset checks in with a local medical group to talk about the effects of these delays on public health.

GUEST: Dr. Don Hoscheit, chief medical officer at Duly Health and Care