Re-Imagine Chicago: How Mayors Have Approached Community Investment

Virus Outbreak A Community Beset
An elderly man crosses the street in the Auburn Gresham neighborhood next to a billboard promoting safety measures against COVID-19 in Chicago, Thursday, Aug. 27, 2020. In Chicago, one of the nation's most segregated cities, nearly 43 percent of the virus' victims have been Black, more than twice the number of whites. David Goldman / AP Photo
Virus Outbreak A Community Beset
An elderly man crosses the street in the Auburn Gresham neighborhood next to a billboard promoting safety measures against COVID-19 in Chicago, Thursday, Aug. 27, 2020. In Chicago, one of the nation's most segregated cities, nearly 43 percent of the virus' victims have been Black, more than twice the number of whites. David Goldman / AP Photo

Re-Imagine Chicago: How Mayors Have Approached Community Investment

In our series Re-imagine Chicago, Reset is teaming up with the University of Chicago’s Center for Effective Government at the Harris School of Public Policy to explore how Chicago’s systems and institutions work and how they could work better for residents.

To kick off our discussion of community investment, we learn about how recent Chicago mayors have approached economic development at the neighborhood level. We also hear from people working in two Chicago neighborhoods about what type of investment they need.

GUESTS: Natalie Moore, WBEZ race, class and communities reporter

Danny Ecker, Crain’s Chicago Business commercial real estate reporter

Nedra Sims-Fears, executive director at Greater Chatham Initiative

Ivette Treviño, executive director at Little Village Chamber of Commerce