Research: End Daylight Saving Time For Our Health’s Sake

Daylight Saving Time
In this Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, photo, Sue Dillon poses in her home in Carmel, Ind., with some of the petitions gathered to change Indiana time zone. Dillon became a campaigner for changes to the state's time choice after a teenager was fatally struck in 2009 while running to catch a school bus in the early morning darkness near her home. Michael Conroy / AP Photo
Daylight Saving Time
In this Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, photo, Sue Dillon poses in her home in Carmel, Ind., with some of the petitions gathered to change Indiana time zone. Dillon became a campaigner for changes to the state's time choice after a teenager was fatally struck in 2009 while running to catch a school bus in the early morning darkness near her home. Michael Conroy / AP Photo

Research: End Daylight Saving Time For Our Health’s Sake

This weekend, we spring forward one hour into Daylight Saving Time.

Dr. Beth Malow of the Vanderbilt University Medical Center.tells Reset why ending the practice of changing our clocks is better for our health.

GUEST: Beth Malow, professor of Neurology and Pediatrics, Burry chair in Cognitive Childhood Development and director of the Sleep Disorders Division at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Lead researcher of the study, “Are Daylight Saving Time Changes Bad for the Brain?”