Why Chicagoland Scientists Are Studying Asteroid Fragments

One scientist calls it a “unique chance to unravel a key piece of the puzzle that is the formation and evolution of our solar system.”

Why Chicagoland Scientists Are Studying Asteroid Fragments
Argonne Distinguished Fellow Esen Ercan Alp changes the settings on equipment at APS Beamline 3-ID-B, where scientists measured the composition of fragments of a near-Earth asteroid. (Image by Jason Creps/Argonne National Laboratory.)
Why Chicagoland Scientists Are Studying Asteroid Fragments
Argonne Distinguished Fellow Esen Ercan Alp changes the settings on equipment at APS Beamline 3-ID-B, where scientists measured the composition of fragments of a near-Earth asteroid. (Image by Jason Creps/Argonne National Laboratory.)

Why Chicagoland Scientists Are Studying Asteroid Fragments

One scientist calls it a “unique chance to unravel a key piece of the puzzle that is the formation and evolution of our solar system.”

What can an asteroid fragment tell us about the history of our planet and our solar system?

Reset checks in with two scientists, who are among a select few in the world, who have the opportunity to study fragments from an asteroid collected by a Japanese space mission.

GUESTS: Esen Ercan Alp, Argonne Distinguished Fellow, Argonne National Laboratory

Barbara Lavina, Beamline Scientist, University of Chicago/Argonne