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Latest from Reset with Sasha-Ann Simons
In the summer 2022, Gregory Michie was unexpectedly reassigned for the fall term from teaching middle school children to instructing K-8 students.
The Department of Justice filed a lawsuit against Live Nation and its subsidiary, Ticketmaster, calling the company a “monopoly.”
The Chicago Department of Public Health is training members of the public to identify warning signs.
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Learning English is a priority for asylum seekers as they create new lives outside of city-run shelters.
Drifting smoke from fires across North America are still expected to cause air pollution in Chicago, but experts say it’s likely to be milder than what caused last year’s thick haze and dangerous air quality.
For tourists, Illinois is the place to be for the historic cicada emergence. The 17-year brood in the state’s northern half and the 13-year brood in the southern part are set to converge near Springfield.
Illinois mistakenly overspent its latest round of funding and will run out of money for hundreds of programs that serve about 15,000 kids in Chicago. The programs’ advocates encourage state lawmakers to intervene.
In January, a Yellow Banana executive promised the city his company would improve after multiple delays opening stores in underserved South and West side communities.
The National Museum of Mexican Art plans to turn this long-vacant structure into the Yollocalli youth arts center.
Ald. Matt Martin wants a hearing after former mayoral staffers complained of mistreatment and then were put on the do-not-hire list.

Johnson campaigned on ridding of the technology, saying it over-polices Black and brown communities.
Noon Whistle Brewing’s timely offering is made with the real insects.
While the Chicago mayor has placed experienced city workers in charge of agencies, senior leaders in his inner circle lack government experience.
The U.S. State Department issued a “worldwide caution” alert, saying it had learned of an “increased potential for foreign terrorist organization-inspired violence against LGBTQI+ persons and events.”
Expanded weekend services, including road tests and written tests, will be offered June 1 through Aug. 31, historically the busiest season for teenagers looking to get behind the wheel.
Bears President Kevin Warren has rejected the 48.6-acre Michael Reese site, saying it’s too narrow and doesn’t work because the stadium would have to be built “over an active train line.”
The lawsuit claims systematic pay disparities between female and male employees, as well as between Black and white employees, under its current and previous owners.
The draft policy aims to undercut a dramatic rise in stops that disproportionately target people of color and rarely lead to arrests. “It felt like it was time to do something about it,” said Foxx, who is stepping down as Cook County state’s attorney this year.
Two experts from the regional EPA office join WBEZ to tell us what we can expect. Reporter: Lauren Frost; Host: Melba Lara
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