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Ailsa Chang

This week marks the one year anniversary of the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. Here’s a timeline of how the day unfolded.
Illinois Sen. Tammy Duckworth tells NPR’s Ailsa Chang about meeting Sen. John McCain for the first time when she was a wounded veteran in Walter Reed Medical Center. McCain died Saturday at 81.
Andrew Young, former mayor of Atlanta and African-American civil rights activist, says the fight to remove monuments memorializing the Confederacy alienates potential civil rights allies.
Journalist Kate Fagan’s new book digs into the life of a young woman whose suicide shocked the University of Pennsylvania, where she ran track. Madison Holleran’s life seemed perfect, until it wasn’t.
Maine Republican Susan Collins recently opposed Betsy DeVos for education secretary. Collins will be at the center of some of President Trump’s big fights, from health care to the Supreme Court.
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President Trump plans to announce his choice to fill the vacant ninth seat on Tuesday. There are a series of actions required to make the replacement official; it is expected to take months.
A late-night “vote-a-rama” set in motion the process for gutting key provisions of the Affordable Care Act in a way that evades Democrats’ threat of a filibuster.
The late-night “vote-a-rama” set in motion the process for gutting key provisions of the Affordable Care Act in a way that evades Democrats’ threat of a filibuster.
What happens to sexual relationships after service members return from combat? Former Marine Chuck Rotenberry and his wife, Liz, open up about their struggles with sex and his PTSD.
Gerrymandering is a venerable American tradition. NPR’s Ailsa Chang gets the latest on court challenges to this practice from Nicholas Stephanopoulos, a lawyer for a plaintiff in one of the cases.
Former Democratic Sen. Evan Bayh’s double-digit lead in a Senate race has shrunk after weathering criticism for making a home in Washington, D.C., instead of Indiana during his years after the Senate.
The bill would let families of the victims of the Sept. 11 attacks sue Saudi Arabia for aiding or financing the attacks. The White House says the move could put U.S. interests and personnel at risk.
It’s getting awkward in the Senate, where members go out of their way to avoid directly chastising each other. The low-simmering annoyance with Sanders for staying in the contest is palpable.
In just minutes, final polls close in New Hampshire, and the candidates await results in the state’s presidential primary contests.
Going into the New Hampshire primary on Tuesday, Sen. Bernie Sanders appeared poised to defeat rival Hillary Clinton in the state. NPR explores how meaningful such an outcome would be for each campaign going forward.
What is being done to fight heroin and prescription drug abuse in hard-hit states like New Hampshire? What can Congress do to help? Lawmakers tackle the issue.