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Lindsey Tanner

A popular TV series that showed a teen ending her life may have triggered a surge in online searches for suicide, including how to do it. That’s according to a new study about the show “13 Reasons Why.” Netflix released all 13 episodes on March 31. Researchers found that for almost three weeks afterward, there were at least 900,000 more than expected Google searches including the word “suicide.” That’s a 19-percent increase based on forecasts using Google Trends and historical search trends. Searches included suicide methods, suicide hotlines and suicide prevention.
An influential doctors group is beefing up warnings about marijuana’s potential harms for teens amid increasingly lax laws and attitudes on pot use. Many parents use the drug and think it’s OK for their kids, but “we would rather not mess around with the developing brain,” said Dr. Seth Ammerman.
U.S. women are increasingly using marijuana during pregnancy, sometimes to treat morning sickness, new reports suggest. Though the actual numbers are small, the trend raises concerns because of evidence linking the drug with low birth weights and other problems.
A study in the medical journal Pediatrics shows that as electronic cigarettes have grown in popularity, more parents have been calling poison hotlines. At a local “vape” shop, WBEZ’s Dan Weissmann got a response.