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Judge Releases Some Of Laquan McDonald's Juvenile Records

A Cook County judge has ordered that the juvenile records of a black teen slain by a white Chicago police officer by released to the officer’s attorneys. At the same time, attorneys for Officer Jason Van Dyke asked the judge Tuesday to dismiss the charges against their client.


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Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke

Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke, charged with first-degree murder in the October 2014 shooting death of a black teenager, Laquan McDonald, sits in court for a hearing in his case in Chicago in May 2016.

Nancy Stone

A Cook County judge has ordered that the juvenile records of a black teen slain by a white Chicago police officer be released to the officer’s attorneys.

At the same time, attorneys for Officer Jason Van Dyke asked the judge Tuesday to dismiss the charges against their client.

Van Dyke faces first-degree murder charges in the October 2014 death of Laquan McDonald, who was shot 16 times.

Judge Vincent Gaughan also ordered the release of McDonald’s juvenile records to Van Dyke’s attorneys, except for records about his birth mother and sister. A juvenile court judge previously denied requests for those records.

Gaughan said he would review the material and rule later on whether it is relevant in Van Dyke’s murder trial.

The files are confidential, but interested parties can have access with a judge’s consent. Van Dyke’s attorneys argue he qualifies as an interested party.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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