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Chicago Police Say Body Camera Didn't Work During Shooting

CPD says all three police officers involved in the fatal shooting of the black teenager wore body cameras during the incident. But the actual shooting was not recorded. The officers have since been stripped of their police powers.

CPD Superintendent Eddie Johnson declined to say whether the officer who fired the fatal shot failed to turn on the camera or if the device malfunctioned. He says that’s part of an ongoing investigation by Independent Police Review Authority.

WBEZ’s Susie An reports.

SHARE Chicago Police Say Body Camera Didn't Work During Shooting
A police officer from Indiana holds the body camera he wears on his shift. Chicago police are investigating why the body camera of an officer involved in the fatal shooting of an unarmed 18-year-old last week was not recording at the time.

A police officer from Indiana shows the body camera he wears on his uniform.

Darron Cummings

Chicago police say the body cameras of officers involved in the fatal shooting of an unarmed 18-year-old last week were not recording at the time of the incident.

CPD says all three police officers were wearing body cameras during the incident, but the actual shooting was not recorded.

On Thursday, police stopped 18-year old Paul O’Neal in a car that had been reported stolen. Police then allegedly opened fire after O’Neal put the car in drive and sideswiped a squad car.

The three officers involved in the shooting were relieved of their police powers after officials said a preliminary determination concluded they violated department policy.

Superintendent Eddie Johnson declined to say whether the officer who fired the fatal shot failed to turn on the camera or if the device malfunctioned, saying that information is part of an ongoing investigation by the Independent Police Review Authority.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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