Your NPR news source

Settlement Reached In Police ‘Code Of Silence’ Case, As Trial Was Set To Begin

City attorneys say the $2 million settlement has absolutely nothing to do with Mayor Emanuel having to testify. The city was being sued by two officers who say they were retaliated against for telling on dirty cops who were shaking down drug dealers. They claim their careers were ruined for violating the longstanding “code of silence.”

SHARE Settlement Reached In Police ‘Code Of Silence’ Case, As Trial Was Set To Begin
Skeptics Doubt New Chicago Video Policy Will Rebuild Trust

FILE: Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel participates in a panel discussion entitled: Reducing Violence and Strengthening Police/Community Trust, Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2016, during the U.S. Conference of Mayors Winter Meeting in Washington.

AP Photo/Cliff Owen

A jury trial over the “code of silence” within the Chicago Police Department was scheduled to start Tuesday.

Federal judge Gary Feinerman ruled that Mayor Rahm Emanuel would have to testify in the case. But a $2 million settlement now means the mayor will not have to.

The city was being sued by two officers who say they were retaliated against for telling on dirty cops who were shaking down drug dealers. They claim their careers were ruined for violating the longstanding “code of silence.”

For years the city had denied the code of silence existed. But then in December Emanuel went before the city council and admitted that there is indeed a thin blue line in Chicago. That is why the judge ordered Emanuel submit to questioning before the jury - despite the best efforts of city attorneys.

The Latest
Learning English is a priority for asylum seekers as they create new lives outside of city-run shelters.
Drifting smoke from fires across North America are still expected to cause air pollution in Chicago, but experts say it’s likely to be milder than what caused last year’s thick haze and dangerous air quality.
Sunday marked the last day for four of the eight Walmart stores in Chicago: three neighborhood markets and one Supercenter. Host: Mary Dixon; Reporter: Michael Puente
Chicago is a food writer’s delicious playground, and a new guide book aims to point you to all the best dishes created in the city. Reset learns more about those dishes, where to find them and the origin stories that started them all. GUESTS: Monica Eng, author of Made in Chicago and Chicago reporter for AXIOS David Hammond, author of Made in Chicago and Chicago food writer